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Pigtail enquiry

So I'm looking for an effective way to attach a kite line to my Levitation Delta kite and it seems a number of people are recommending the use of a pigtail. Problem is I'm finding it hard to find good instructions online on how to tie a pigtail. I did come across this tutorial video but it's still not clear to me how to actually tie the knot.

It is mentioned in the video that it is a double overhand knot. So i then searched for instructions on how to tie one of those. I came across these two videos but they seem to show different kinds of knots sharing the same name.


Is one of these essentially the same as a pigtail?

Also, what length of line would you recommend for a pigtail?

And with regards to cutting braided dacron line to the required length, is it preferable to use a specific kind of cutting tool or would any knife or scissors do the job just as well?

Comments

  • You seem to want to make your kite-flying very difficult. That video about the pigtail refers to a SIMPLE overhand knot, not a double one. It also shows the knot being tied. The length of line is whatever looks right. You need to understand that there are not hard-and-fast rules about everything, it is often just a case of using common sense. There is a later video which shows the procedure in perhaps more detail , see https://youtu.be/eHDNyYZrgDk. Also there is a video on Into The Wind's YouTube channel showing exactly how to assemble your kite AND how to tie the line on. I made both those videos, and I deliberately made them as simple as possible. As for cutting line, use whatever is handy, whether that be scissors, a knife, or an axe. Just be sure to use a match or lighter to melt and seal the cut ends to avoid fraying. Try to stop worrying about the details and just enjoy flying your kite - it's only fun when the kite is in the air!

  • edited November 12

    I usually use a double loop knot at the end of the bridle, then a lark's head knot or swivel to attach the line. If using a lark's head, just slide it down to the knot part of the double loop knot - the loop itself is not actually used.
    https://my-best-kite.com/loop-knot.html#DOUBLELOOP

  • edited November 12

    Montagdude, interesting alternative! I might practise using a double loop knot and see how it fares. Though I guess you'd need another loop in the same line to keep it escaping from the eyelet in the keel if used on a kite like a Levitation Delta?

  • edited November 12

    It seems like you could just thread the line through the eyelet so that half is on each side, then tie the knot by lining up both ends. Or do it the same way as in the video, replacing the overhand knot with a double loop knot. But I don't think it matters that much which one you choose.

  • Montagdude, I think you are confusing Dragonblade even more. If he goes on like this his Levitation delta will rot away before he gets to use it. The video on Into The Wind's YouTube channel https://youtu.be/HHQFSnRz2cc shows everything he needs about the Levitation, including assembly and tying on the line. The video I mentioned in my last comment, https://youtu.be/eHDNyYZrgDk , also shows the simplest possible way to attach the line, and simple is clearly what he needs. Flying a delta is a very easy process, and should not require months of preparation and a whole lot of instruction and rules. KISS is very applicable here as in most things in life.

  • edited November 13

    NZflier: “There is a later video which shows the procedure in perhaps more detail , see
    That is indeed a good tutorial for making a larkshead knot and attaching it. Though I was specifically asking how to tie a pigtail.

    NZflier: “Also there is a video on Into The Wind's YouTube channel showing exactly how to assemble your kite AND how to tie the line on.”

    Yes Ive watched that video. A very good instruction video overall for setting up the Levitation Delta. Though when it comes to tying the pigtail, the fingers are obstructing the view some of the time and it’s also done very quickly. So it can be hard to tell exactly what is going on. By contrast, there are many great tutorial videos on youtube on how to tie different types of knots. These are filmed in close up with the fingers and hands not blocking the view and the procedure is generally done at a slow pace.

    And regarding the video I linked to above which actually shows how to tie a pigtail, the fingers are in the way nearly half the time, preventing a clear view of what is happening.

    NZflier: “Just be sure to use a match or lighter to melt and seal the cut ends to avoid fraying.”

    Very good points.

  • I think the best thing to do is link to an instructional video on how to tie the same type of knot as a pigtail (which may be known by a different name.) Preferably a video which shows a clear, unobstructed view of the process and is done one step at a time.
    By the way, that double loop knot above was easy to follow.

  • It's just a simple overhand knot, the simplest knot it's possible to tie.

  • I should perhaps add that the original video you referred to on how to use a pigtail has been viewed by over 115,000 people, and yours is the first comment I've had from someone who was unable to understand it. If you want another, maybe slightly clearer, view of how to do it, see https://youtu.be/q5qAgwY-B00 . That shows how to make a tie-down for a kite, which is essentially the same as a pigtail, and to my eyes it very clearly illustrates exactly how to tie it.

  • edited November 14

    NZflier: "If you want another, maybe slightly clearer, view of how to do it, see . That shows how to make a tie-down for a kite, which is essentially the same as a pigtail, and to my eyes it very clearly illustrates exactly how to tie it."

    That video offers a better demonstration on how to tie a pigtail. That's just what I needed. And also a very good demonstration on how to do a larkshead knot as well. Overall a great video. Very useful.

  • I'm glad it was useful!

  • Out of curiosity, would a pigtail be suitably strong enough for a picavet line as well? Obviously, when threading a line through a picavet, the two ends of that line would need to be tied together or joined in some way. And I guess a pigtail might be one option here.

  • Because there are 8 lines supporting the rig when using a picavet, the force on a knot in the picavet line will be just 1/8th of the weight of the rig. So even for a heavy rig any knot which tightens under strain (e.g. a simple reef knot) is quite sufficient. A dab of glue on the knot will make it even safer.

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